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Review: "Sharp Objects" by Gillian Flynn


From Goodreads:  WICKED above her hipbone, GIRL across her heart
Words are like a road map to reporter Camille Preaker’s troubled past. Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, Camille’s first assignment from the second-rate daily paper where she works brings her reluctantly back to her hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls.

NASTY on her kneecap, BABYDOLL on her leg
Since she left town eight years ago, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows: a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed again in her family’s Victorian mansion, Camille is haunted by the childhood tragedy she has spent her whole life trying to cut from her memory.

HARMFUL on her wrist, WHORE on her ankle
As Camille works to uncover the truth about these violent crimes, she finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Clues keep leading to dead ends, forcing Camille to unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past to get at the story. Dogged by her own demons, Camille will have to confront what happened to her years before if she wants to survive this homecoming.

With its taut, crafted writing, Sharp Objects is addictive, haunting, and unforgettable.


My Thoughts:

Likes: I loved this book!  I stayed up until the wee hours of the morning to finish it which is huge considering that I don't get a lot of sleep these days.  All the twists and turns made it impossible to put this book down.  I loved the odd small town setting and OMG, the whole story is just plain creepy.  Honestly, I don't  know where Flynn comes up with this stuff; her head must be a very weird place.  The end left me so shocked that I had to read it twice before it set in.

Characters:  This is the second of Flynn's books where I found her incredibly damaged main character to be endearing.  There was just something about Camille that made me want to give her a big hug.  She didn't always make the best choices but considering her past, it wasn't that surprising.  Adora and Ama are two of the creepiest characters that I have ever seen.  Good Lord, they freaked me out.  

Overall:  Read this book.  I know a lot of people didn't like Gone, Girl but don't let that deter you from reading this book.  I actually thought Sharp Objects was way better!  4 stars.

Comments

  1. The new format works for me! I'm just so glad I still have this place to get my recommendations!

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